2018 press coverage

SEPTEMBER 2018 COVER AND FEATURE IN BLAC DETROIT MAGAZINE

 

Changing Keys 

Deekah Wyatt (featured on this month's cover) knows about the zones of comfort and tends to ignore them. The creator of the Cosmic Slop Festival  – featuring rock musicians of color – as well the founder of the group  Roxolydian, Wyatt stays busy. Playing and performing around metro  Detroit seems like, for her, the ultimate dream. As a kid, she  "stumbled" into rock via Kurt Cobain and Nirvana, but her father had a  better idea – Jimi Hendrix. The exposure literally opened up her skull  and freed her mind.


She started creating music and doing the open mic circuit, but that  was back when "no one wanted to see a black woman with a guitar for a  while." Although the black rock scene is populated by black women, and  while the overarching theme extends to something like progress, women  still have issues – even in a progressive city like metro Detroit.  "There's going to be different genres," Wyatt says. "It ain't all got to  be smooth, it ain't all gotta be in E flat. Shake it up a little bit. I  wondered what would the world have looked like if rock 'n' roll hadn't  been whitewashed? How free I feel sometimes. It's not a miracle cure but  a motherfucker feels powerful."


She's encouraged that groups such as Raven Love and the 27s, Cast  Iron Cornbread, Blackmail, Scientific Sunshine, and a host of others –  Roxolydian included – are pointing the way toward a movement that many  don't even know exist; it's happening right in their backyard. The  Cosmic Slop Festival was a way to give these groups and others a place  to gather. Still, there's plenty of work to do. "The problem I've  encountered was being taken seriously," Wyatt says. "I've also had some  beautiful moments with people. My experience being a black woman being  in rock 'n' roll is misogyny has no color. It's color blind. It's  frustrating to me that rock 'n' roll is treated like a redheaded  stepchild by black folk. I would just love for us to understand how  liberating it can feel." 


Read the full article here.

curvy black woman singing with eyes closed holding a silver guitar with a graffiti wall behind her

curvy black woman singing with eyes closed holding a silver guitar with a graffiti wall behind her